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Rohtasgarh Fort

Rohtasgarh Fort
The Rohtasgarh Fort is situated on the top of the Kaimur Hills in Bihar. The Rohtasgarh Fort located in Rohtas district is Fouthy-six kilometers far from Sasaram. It got its name from mythological character Rohiteshwa, the son of King Harischandra. The king stayed in this fort in deportation for several years having form danger to his life. On the top of the hill the Fort is constructed on a plateau at a height of 1600 ft above the sea level. There are about 2000 limestone cut steps from the bottom to the top. The end of these steps there is a gate which is the first gate to the fort. From this gate Rohtas Fort lies at a distance of 2km. The Rohtas fort is an residual example of Mughal architectural style. Once one the largest and strongest fort in India now is in remains.


The Rohtas Fort was constructed on a plateau over the top of a hill with steeply rising sides. The steps directing to the fort cut into limestone of the hill. Many streams crossed the plateau and the soil was productive, which help in easy growth of the crops, so that the residents of the fort could hold out for months against an foe besieging the fort. 

Rohtasgarh Fort
In 1539 AT, the Fort of Rohtas passed out of the hands of the Hindu kings into those of Sher Shah Suri. She Shah Suri had just lost the Fort at Chunar in a fight with the Mughal emperor Humayun and was heartsick to gain a foothold for himself. Sher Shah requested the ruler of Rohtas that he wanted to leave his women, children and treasure in the safety of the fort, while he was away fighting in Bengal. The king agreed and the first few palanquins had women and children. But the later ones contained fierce Afghan soldiers, who captured Rohtas and forced the Hindu king to flee. During the Sher Shah's reign 10000-armed men guarded the fort.

Further towards west, some construction must have taken place although there is no written evidence of what it was. The locals call it the Hanging House, as the fall from here is a straight 1600 ft down with no obstacles on the way. Locals have a story to tell about this place that this spot is the mouth of a cave, where a Muslim fakir (mendicant) is buried. It is said that he was thrown from here into the valley three times. In spite of being bound hand and foot, the fakir escaped unhurt each time. Ultimately he was buried in the cave. About a mile to the northeast of the Palace are the ruins of two temples. One is the Rohtasan, a temple of Lord Shiva.

There are other Attraction:- Takhte Badshahi, Aina Mahal, Jama Masjid, Ganesh temple and Lord Shiva temple.